Monday, January 4, 2016

Monday Musings

I am my own paparazzi. My paltry 15 minutes of fame, created by, well, ME.

A few years ago, a 21 yo man decided to do an experiment.  He hired "body guards" and photographers to follow him around Times Square, NYC.  He attracted a crowd of 300 screaming, adoring fans.  People said he was a movie star -- the most up and coming exciting star.  People said he just dropped a new music album.  He posed, for 3 hours, with hysterical people who just had to have their photo taken with him.  The highlight of their life.

Face book and other social media have become the digital platforms for us to brag about ourselves.  Remember when it was frowned upon to be a braggart?  Donald Trump is a braggart, a blowhard, and people don't seem to have a problem recognizing this.  Most of us, anyway.

I have been guilty of tooting my own horn, and using social media to do it.  In hindsight, I cringe.  I am no stranger to the allure of seeing my greatness posted for all to see.

What do  you do when confronted by a braggart?  I suppose it depends on your relationship with them.  With Trump, I can call him on it because he's so, well, obvious and despicable.  But when the braggart is someone you love?

I've stopped seeing people (rarely, but yes) because I became bored and tired of their braggart ways.  I know it comes from their insecurity, but I've not found a good way to let them know how I feel, so I let the friendship fade away.  Was I doing them a favor?  I don't know, but I managed to extricate my own self, and that's what is important, right?

So, onto the braggarts that I actually care about.  I have my response at the ready:  "You are a great friend, but your insistence on constantly bringing up xxxxxxxxxx feels alienating given that I'm someone who already adores you. I love you because you're interesting and funny, but it's not interesting or funny to hear someone brag about themselves."

And because I am obsessive about these things, I imagine their response will be that I am simply jealous.  Sigh.

Have a braggart in your life?  Oh, please do share.






8 comments:

  1. But my dear, it's perfectly OK for you to suggest the light of your achievements, because you HAVE so many and we applaud them. Braggarts are twits who usually take credit for other people's achievements. Trump is a perfect example.I would say his moral shadow is long and deep. His third blowup wifelet is a prime example.

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    1. Ha! I knew this post would elicit response. The definition is a loud, arrogant boaster. Completely different that sharing one's creative work, though I suppose HOW one does it is important.

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  2. I don't really know any braggarts, but I think it's because I don't know very many people anymore. What do people brag about these days? I got nothing.

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    1. oh, they brag about who they know, what fine establishments they go to, how much their hotel room costs, and what kind of car they drive.

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    2. Well I got Robin beat. I got plenty of nothing!!!

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  3. Interesting thoughts. But if you can't brag about your own accomplishments, who will? Should we hide under an umbrella or proudly speak about what we do that makes us feel good? I am not sure when it's about too much ego or maybe just the right amount. I have a friend who paints and she often proudly shows what she did on Facebook or her shows. Maybe she's just encouraging others to get out there and take some risks with their own art.

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    1. see my response above. There is a fine line between sharing one's creative work and being a braggart. I love that I have creative friends (like you) who share their creations.

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    2. me too. When I was in Tucson, I saw the calendar you created a few years back and thought again how wonderful it was. I love seeing the photos you and Steve take of places you go like the recent Yosemite. I think it encourages us all

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